GLOBAL CAMPUS FIRST YEAR STUDIES


The first year at the University of Utah Asia Campus is called Global Campus First Year Studies. First-year students complete a set of foundational courses: A two-semester sequence on the topic of global citizenship; introductory major courses; courses to develop academic writing skills; and also math and science. The second year is focused on coursework for the major. Students will typically spend two semesters, roughly around their third year of studies, at the University of Utah Salt Lake City campus. The fourth year integrates degree coursework with career readiness and preparation.

Upon completion of these first year courses, students receive a Global Citizenship Certificate.

GLOBAL CAMPUS FIRST YEAR STUDIES
SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2
Credit Hours Courses Credit Hours Courses
3 Global Citizenship I (UGS 2230) 3 Global Citizenship II (UGS 2237)
3 Introduction to Academic Writing (WRTG 1010) 3 Academic Writing and Research (WRTG 2010)
4 Introduction to Sociology (SOC 1010) 4 Introduction to Psychology (PSY 1010)
3 Introduction to Media Business & Ethics (COMM 3505) 3 U.S National Government (POLS 1100)
3 Human Biology (BIOL 1030) OR Plants and
Society (BIOL 1330)
4 College Algebra (MATH 1050) OR
Calculus I (MATH 1210)
1 Path for a Successful Start at U (UC 1010)

*Based on placement

Semester 1

3 credit hours per semester

This freshman, first-year experience will help the student develop critical thinking, reading and writing skills and integrative thinking. The theme—global citizenship—will help students understand the way the globalization of our planet affects each of them. From healthcare, to the environment, to poverty and to popular culture, they will discover ways to define their global footprint and explore global ideas and solutions.

3 credit hours

Students learn to read and write rhetorically, develop and support claims, and produce and evaluate writing in collaboration with peers. Course readings and assignments emphasize writing for diverse purposes and disciplines. To be taken during Freshman year.

3 credit hours

An introduction to the basic nature of society and the relationship between society and the individual. This course focuses on how society functions and is organized, and how society impacts and influences individual motivation, understanding, action, and well-being. Basic sociological ideas regarding social relations, social interaction, social structure, and social change are examined. Students are introduced to key issues addressed by contemporary sociologists; class, race, gender, sexuality, religion, globalization, education, health care, crime, the media, and the environment. The knowledge gained in these course will aid students in future studies within a variety of fields and careers, and encourage the development of critical thinking about important issues.

3 credit hours

This course addresses mediated communication as it enables – and affects – how people interact, pursue goals, and produce results. It emphasizes critical consumption of media messages and the implications of producing such messages. Students engage with technological, business, historical, legal, and ethical foundations of mediated communication to become more informed and responsible participants and citizens”

3 credit hours

An introduction to the biology of humans, including an examination of the evolution, function and form of the human body. This course is intended for non-majors.

3 credit hours

This course will survey the plants useful or harmful to humans and will explore their origins and history, botanical relationships and constituents that make them economically important. This course is suitable for non-majors with no previous biology experience.

3 credit hours

Students learn to read and write rhetorically, develop and support claims, and produce and evaluate writing in collaboration with peers. Course readings and assignments emphasize writing for diverse purposes and disciplines. To be taken during Freshman year.

Semester 2

3 credit hours per semester

This freshman, first-year experience will help the student develop critical thinking, reading and writing skills and integrative thinking. The theme—global citizenship—will help students understand the way the globalization of our planet affects each of them. From healthcare, to the environment, to poverty and to popular culture, they will discover ways to define their global footprint and explore global ideas and solutions.

3 credit hours
Course components: Seminar course

Writing in undergraduate academic contexts. Students practice analytical and persuasive writing that addresses various academic audiences in a research university. Emphasis on writing for learning, textual analysis, writing from research, and collaborative writing. To be taken Freshman year.

3 credit hours

The scientific study of human and animal behavior: rationale, methods of inference, selected findings, and some applications.

3 credit hours

Required of all majors; should be taken during first year.  Constitutional basis of American government; public opinion, political participation, media, parties, interest groups; governmental decision makers (Congress, presidency, bureaucracy, courts)

4 credit hours

Functions, inverses and graphs; polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of equations and matrices; applications; arithmetic and geometric sequences and series.

4 credit hours

Functions and their graphs, differentiation of polynomial, rational and trigonometric functions. Velocity and acceleration. Geometric applications of the derivative, minimization and maximization problems, the indefinite integral, and an introduction to differential equations. The definite integral and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.